If this is true, and it probably is, this video interview of Ian Rogers on The Verge is a good look at his vision of streaming music. It was first released when Beats Music landed in the App Store last year. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkwoGRZ3onk

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)
spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)
spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.

It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:

  1. To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
  2. These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
  3. The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
  4. The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
  5. After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.

It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.
Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.

Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings

Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Farley Katz: http://nyr.kr/1l3LIq0

newyorker:

“With seventy-two per cent of respondents saying that they were ‘upset’ or ‘very upset’ to be reminded of her existence, Palin is one of three non-officeholders whose recent utterances have traumatized Americans.”

Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kIh9Gf

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty.

parislemon:

Rani Molla:

Craft beer makers have experienced huge jumps in market share while the overall beer market size has shrunk. The Census Bureau announced yesterday that the number of breweries in the in the U.S. doubled in five years–an increase largely due to craft beer. On average over the past two years, 1.2 craft breweries opened each day, contributing to a total of 15.6 million barrels of beer last year.

Yes, 1.2 craft breweries a day.

A bubble?

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Stunning Geometric Tape Floor Installations by Jim Lambie

With regular vinyl tape, Glasgow-based artist Jim Lambie transforms any given space into a colorful, mesmerizing landscape that often create optical illusions.

Read More

For those who are not from Ontario, Andrea Horwath, the leader of the NDP here in the province, forced an election in late spring. In doing so, she rejected a very progressive budget from the Liberals who were in power and exposed what was, in my view, her prioritizing of her own ambition over the interests of the province.

I like the NDP, and agree with much of their policies, but Horwath got greedy, and started shifting to a populist, oddly anti-government, and sometimes utopian rhetoric that seemed strained and economically uninformed. The Liberal party, led by Premier Kathleen Wynne, were left standing as the only reasonable, balanced party to vote for. (the Progressive Conservatives, under leader Tim Hudak, took a Karl Rove-ian turn to the right only to be handily defeated by voters who were stunned and dumfounded by their recklessness.)

I don’t think Ontarians love the liberals, but they clearly do not like callous, selfish leaders; those who abandon their ideals in the pursuit of power. Those who drum up a scandal against one party when they are also complicit, if only slightly less so. Horwath may have had good intentions - we don’t know her inner ambitions or thoughts - but she came across as overly ambitious, not magnanimous, and as having her own interests in mind over the broader interests of the public.

At the end of the day, I am happy the election went as it did (the liberals gained a clear mandate with a majority government), if only because I think the liberals are the best leaders for the province right now and because it’s a message to other parties in how not run a campaign and how not to treat the democratic process.