thisistheverge:

I burned through my inbox with Mailbox for Mac
Email, right guys? Some love it. Some hate it. Some are trying to replace it. But the fact is, we all use it. And since early 2013, Mailbox has been the fastest way to manage it, but it’s only worked on iPhone and Android. Today, however, Mailbox for Mac is finally available in beta, and it offers a taste of how email might feel if it weren’t bound by the age-old technologies underpinning it. All current Mailbox users will soon receive an email with a “beta coin” offering access to the app. (Everybody else will have to sign up for access on MailboxApp.com and wait a few weeks.)

  1. Camera: Panasonic DMC-GX1
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/60th
  4. Focal Length: 21mm

Think about this next time you head to Starbucks…

newyorker:

A cartoon by Mike Twohy. For more cartoons from the magazine this week: http://nyr.kr/1pAm6nz

newyorker:

Why is the U.S. dropping bombs to defend the Kurdish city, two and a half years after American troops left Iraq? Steve Coll explains: http://nyr.kr/1ykSe1W

“Obama’s defense of Erbil is effectively the defense of an undeclared Kurdish oil state whose sources of geopolitical appeal—as a long-term, non-Russian supplier of oil and gas to Europe, for example—are best not spoken of in polite or naïve company.”

Photograph by Sebastian Meyer/Corbis.

If this is true, and it probably is, this video interview of Ian Rogers on The Verge is a good look at his vision of streaming music. It was first released when Beats Music landed in the App Store last year. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkwoGRZ3onk

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)
spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)
spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.
It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:
To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.
It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.
Videos:  Cutting A Bagel & Interlocking Bagel Rings & Mathematically correct breakfast.
Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings
Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast - How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves. If a torus is cut by a Möbius strip it will split up into to interlocking rings.

It is not hard to cut a bagel into two equal halves which are linked like two links of a chain. Figure 1:

  1. To start, you must visualize four key points.  Center the bagel at the origin, circling the Z axis. A is the highest point above the +X axis.  B is where the +Y axis enters the bagel. C is the lowest point below the -X axis.  D is where the -Y axis exits the bagel.
  2. These sharpie markings on the bagel are just to help visualize the geometry and the points.  You don’t need to actually write on the bagel to cut it properly.
  3. The line ABCDA, which goes smoothly through all four key points, is the cut line.  As it goes 360 degrees around the Z axis, it also goes 360 degrees around the bagel.
  4. The red line is like the black line but is rotated 180 degrees (around Z or through the hole). An ideal knife could enter on the black line and come out exactly opposite, on the red line. But in practice, it is easier to cut in halfway on both the black line and the red line. The cutting surface is a two-twist Mobius strip; it has two sides, one for each half.
  5. After being cut, the two halves can be moved but are still linked together, each passing through the hole of the other.

It is much more fun to put cream cheese on these bagels than on an ordinary bagel. In additional to the intellectual stimulation, you get more cream cheese, because there is slightly more surface area.
Topology problem: Modify the cut so the cutting surface is a one-twist Mobius strip. (You can still get cream cheese into the cut, but it doesn’t separate into two parts). See more at: Mathematically Correct Breakfast: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart.

Images: How to Slice a Bagel into Two Linked Halves by George W. Hart - Cutting bagels into linked halves on Mathematica. - Interlocking Bagel Rings

Maybe, that’s one of the reasons why I love bagel :)

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Farley Katz: http://nyr.kr/1l3LIq0

newyorker:

“With seventy-two per cent of respondents saying that they were ‘upset’ or ‘very upset’ to be reminded of her existence, Palin is one of three non-officeholders whose recent utterances have traumatized Americans.”

Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kIh9Gf

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty.